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7Oct/130

Folk troupes steal the show at cultural event

2005 Powwow
indian songs

Image by Smithsonian Institution
Description: Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women's Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men's Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women's Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer's every movement. The powwow is led by three "host drums" that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.

Creator/Photographer: Katherine Fogden

Medium: Digital photograph

Culture: American Indian

Geography: USA

Date: 2005

Repository: National Museum of the American Indian

Accession number: 081305KFPWe097

Folk troupes steal the show at cultural event
In the first half of the day, troupes performed programmes such as veeragase, dollu kunita, kamsale, pooja kunita, beating drums, kolata, folk songs and ranga geethe, attracting several tourists. When compared to folk events, there were not many people ...
Read more on The New Indian Express

Enunciating Sri Lalitha Sahasranamam
With his deep roots in classical tradition and with his music full of bhava, he has presented classical concerts in all important cities and towns and has won several awards and titles. He is none other than Tadapally Lokanadha Sarma, also a former ...
Read more on The New Indian Express

Scaling new heights with Arabic music
His cadenced, silken notes and remarkable singing prowess has mesmerised anyone who has heard him sing. This young man from Kozhikode, Nadir Abdul Salam, who is settled with his parents in Qatar, is setting forth in securing more milestones in music.
Read more on The New Indian Express

Music Magic has 13 songs
With his first commercial movie all set to hit the big screen, debutant director Mantraakshar DS is both nervous and excited. After making numerous documentaries, short films (including national award winning film, My Wish) and being the brainchild ...
Read more on Times of India

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22Jul/130

Age no bar to learn music at this institute

2005 Powwow
indian songs

Image by Smithsonian Institution
Description: Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women's Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men's Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women's Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer's every movement. The powwow is led by three "host drums" that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.

Creator/Photographer: Katherine Fogden

Medium: Digital photograph

Culture: American Indian

Geography: USA

Date: 2005

Repository: National Museum of the American Indian

Accession number: 081305KFPWd135

Age no bar to learn music at this institute
Babitha is still a music student at age 66. Thanks to the M G Radhakrishnan Foundation and Sangeetha Bharathi, life in old age is not as boring as it is anticipated for this group of singers belonging to the M G Radhakrishnan Foundation Choir, where ...
Read more on The New Indian Express

Link between Indian poetry and Welsh song is striking
Ghazal is an ancient Indian poetic form with origins in sixth century Arabic verse. It shares a lot with the tight-metred form of Welsh poetry and songs. Separated by a few thousand miles of land and sea, they have found a home together on Glazalaw, ...
Read more on Daily Post North Wales

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7Jul/120

Latest Indian Songs News

2005 Powwow
indian songs

Image by Smithsonian Institution
Description: Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women's Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men's Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women's Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer's every movement. The powwow is led by three "host drums" that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.

Creator/Photographer: Katherine Fogden

Medium: Digital photograph

Culture: American Indian

Geography: USA

Date: 2005

Persistent URL: http://photography.si.edu/SearchImage.aspx?t=5&id=3775&q=081305KFPWd084

Repository: National Museum of the American Indian

Accession number: 081305KFPWd084

Double entendre, wacky songs score in Bollywood
Wacky, quirky and full of double entendre, Bollywood songs are going irreverent with a vengeance.If "Bhaag D.K.Bose" was a shocker, what about recent numbers like "I am a hunter", "Madam malai" and "Womaniya".
Read more on Times of India

VIDEO: Bacon Brothers will sizzle at Indian Ranch July 8
But when there's any spare time, they strap on guitars, join a couple of other musicians, and head out on the road as the Bacon Brothers. They'll be performing at Indian Ranch in Webster on July 8. The Philadelphia natives have had healthy doses of ...
Read more on MetroWest Daily News

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5Apr/120

Renowned country singer Kathy Mattea to take stage at HCC

Untitled
latest songs

Image by Smithsonian Institution
Description: Thomas Smillie was the Smithsonian's first photographer and curator of photography, beginning his career at the institution in the 1870s. In 1913 he mounted an exhibition on the history of photography in the Smithsonian's Arts and Industries Building, showcasing many of the remarkable advancements made in the field that he feared had already been forgotten or disregarded.

Creator/Photographer: Thomas Smillie
Birth Date: 1843
Death Date: 1917

Born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1843, Thomas William Smillie immigrated to the United States with his family when he five years old. After studying chemistry and medicine at Georgetown University, he took a job as a photographer at the Smithsonian Institution, where he stayed for nearly fifty years until his death in 1917. Smillie's duties and accomplishments at the Smithsonian were vast: he documented important events and research trips, photographed the museum's installations and specimens, created reproductions for use as printing illustrations, performed chemical experiments for Smithsonian scientific researchers, and later acted as the head and curator of the photography lab. Smillie's documentation of each Smithsonian exhibition and installation resulted in an informal record of all of the institution's art and artifacts. In 1913 Smillie mounted an exhibition on the history of photography to showcase the remarkable advancements that had been made in the field but which he feared had already been forgotten.

Medium: Cyanotype

Culture: American

Date: 1913

Persistent URL: http://photography.si.edu/SearchImage.aspx?t=5&id=2141&q=RU95_Box76_085

Repository: Smithsonian Institution Archives

Collection: Thomas Smillie Collection (Record Unit 95) - Thomas Smillie served as the first official photographer for the Smithsonian Institution from 1870 until his death in 1917. As head of the photography lab as well as its curator, he was responsible for photographing all of the exhibits, objects, and expeditions, leaving an informal record of early Smithsonian collections.

Accession number: RU95_Box76_085

Renowned country singer Kathy Mattea to take stage at HCC
Mattea, who is the singer of such classics as "18 Wheels and a Dozen Roses," "Where've You Been" and many other hits, will bring her musical magic to the stage for an evening full of hit songs as well as new material from her latest album, "COAL.
Read more on Baltimore Sun

Big K.R.I.T. Uses Downtown for Music Video
Meridian native, Big KRIT (King Remembered in Time) has become pretty well known in the hip hop world in recent years. He has released several albums, and shot a number of music videos. The crowd lining the street to watch steadily got bigger as the ...
Read more on WTOK

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22Mar/120

Royalty Free Music Library TheMusicase.com Launches the iFrame Feature.

2005 Powwow
youtube music

Image by Smithsonian Institution
Description: Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women's Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men's Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women's Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer's every movement. The powwow is led by three "host drums" that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.

Creator/Photographer: R.A. Whiteside

Medium: Digital photograph

Culture: American Indian

Geography: USA

Date: 2005

Persistent URL: http://photography.si.edu/SearchImage.aspx?t=5&id=3672&q=081405RWPWNMAIc+026

Repository: National Museum of the American Indian

Accession number: 081405RWPWNMAIc 026

Royalty Free Music Library TheMusicase.com Launches the iFrame Feature.
Leading Stock Music library Themusicase.com announces onsite integration with YouTube, Vimeo, FlickR and Facebook using the new iFrame feature. Users will be able test live each music theme while watching their works online. The iFrame version sets a ...
Read more on San Francisco Chronicle (press release)

Can you copyright music of pi? Judge says no
Blake launched a musical video called "What Pi Sounds Like" based on this idea last year, quickly becoming a YouTube sensation. (The original was removed from YouTube, but New Scientist repackaged it.) But Lars Erickson had already created music based ...
Read more on CNN (blog)

Meet Julia Nunes, YouTube's Ukulele Queen
Nunes's claim to fame is her YouTube music videos. Her channel boasts over 200 000 subscribers and her videos, in which the perky, fair-haired musician plays the ukulele and sings both original compositions and covers ranging from The Beach Boys to ...
Read more on Forbes

Song tells cancer patients to 'never give up'
Got to www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-Hn3LVwjsk to watch the music video for “Never Give Up, No Never Give Up” by Carol Tedrow, Tony Fields and Doug Decker. “It's a beautiful day, the sun is shining bright,” Battle Creek's Tony Fields sings in the song ...
Read more on Battle Creek Enquirer

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